© Adeolu Osibodu

What draws an audience to your work is your unique ability to create art or tell a story with your photos. It's evident that Adeolu Osibodu has created his own identity in his craft of portraiture, especially portraiture that started with a smartphone in 2015. "The idea of creating anything at all was always a priceless experience even before photography."

"The fact that you could impart an ounce of yourself into something felt really beautiful. Almost like looking into a mirror."


What are your inspirations?

"I love films and music. With them, you could travel the four corners of the world and dream without leaving a spot. It's like this beautiful doorway, but generally, inspiration comes from absolutely everything. Nothing is uninspirational."


What do you want to convey with your photographs?

"It's always interesting expressing thoughts and ideas in images. Sometimes it's straight forward and other times it's not. It could be pain, extreme joy, both, or a blend of everything and nothing all at once. Freedom starts when it all happens by itself. Spills out almost like blood. Sometimes images already tend to lean towards some direction. You just have to pronounce or emphasize what they're trying to say."

© Adeolu Osibodu

What is your favorite photo, and the story behind it?

[laughs] "I have affection for all my work. I see them as people. Maybe past selves or versions of myself with uniform part to play. If I had to pick an image that ties the madness altogether, it would be “Home Made Scars”, a self-portrait of myself taken on my bed a few days after my femur fracture surgery. It all revolves around that moment, I guess because that phase birthed a serious drive that keeps me going till today."


This is a part of Seven Foto Questions, a series of interviews with photographers answering the same questions about how they each came into their craft.



What do you consider a “good” photo?

"I've learned that an image could mean multiple things to different people. However, the feature of being “compelling” is very very valuable as it embodies the whole essence of the photograph itself which is "not having to use words."

© Adeolu Osibodu

Can you use one theme to describe your work?

"I'll say “Truth”. Truth to myself at least, because I feel everything I pass through gets channeled into the images. So in a subconscious way, it's like a visual diary."


If there is one thing you want your audience to know about you, what would it be?

[laughs] "I have an apple-shaped birthmark on my cheek."